World Archives Project: New South Wales, Australia, Sheriff's Papers (Part 1)

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This collection contains records regarding prisoners in New South Wales, Australia.

Project Overview

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PLEASE NOTE THE EVENT CITY INSTRUCTIONS HAVE BEEN UPDATED AND THE KEYING IMAGE SAMPLES HAVE BEEN CHANGED TO REFLECT THIS UPDATE.

Project Instructions This collection is a series of correspondence from various authorities mainly concerning prisoners in New South Wales, Australia. We are only keying the names of individuals that the correspondence is about, i.e. We should be keying the individuals involved in the crime (the victim, perpetrator or accused). We should not be keying officers who are arresting, judges presiding, or witnesses who are not "involved" in the crime. Some articles, e.g. articles relating to promotions, for the sake of not making things too complicated, the officer being promoted would be keyed since the article is about them. Names are often found in the margins of the records, but may also be found in the body of the letter itself. Some images contain lists of names to key.

Be careful to not key duplicate names, although if your image set begins in the middle of a correspondence, key all available information.

In order to key this collection properly, some reading will be required.

Project Form Types and Field Helps
Record
Index
Cover page, Section header, etc.
Image with no data


Record

NSWSherrifPaper Key.JPG

Choose the 'record' form type for images with names to key.

Record Keying Instructions

Event City

Key the event city as seen on the record using the dictionary provided for assistance.

  • The event city is the place where the event that is recorded took place and is typically found in the body of the letter.
  • If there is no city listed in the body of the letter, the city the letter was sent to, should be keyed. This may be found at the footer, or bottom of the letter, near the signature or the word "Witness."
  • If a city cannot be found here, it may be keyed from the top of the letter, near the event date (typically Sydney).
  • On images with lists of names, the event city may be found in the header information found at the top of the image.


Event Day

Key the day in its numerical form from the event date. The event date is the date the letter was sent/received.

Event date is typically found at the top of a letter near the event city. On some images, it is also found at the bottom of a letter, typically after the keyword "Witness" near the event city. When the image has a list of names, the event date may be in the header of the image.

Event Month

Key the month as an abbreviation from the event date using the dictionary provided for assistance. The event date is the date the letter was sent/received.

Event date is typically found at the top of a letter near the event city. On some images, it is also found at the bottom of a letter, typically after the keyword "Witness" near the event city. When the image has a list of names, the event date may be in the header of the image.

Event Year

Key the year in its numerical form from the event date. The event date is the date the letter was sent/received. Key each letter/article independent of the others, if the year is 2 digits for the individual letter/article do not expand it. If the year appears as only 1 digit, e.g. 27/7/5 and there is a more complete date on the image, key the more complete date.

Event date is typically found at the top of a letter near the event city. On some images, it is also found at the bottom of a letter, typically after the keyword "Witness" near the event city. When the image has a list of names, the event date may be in the header of the image.

Given

Key the first name or initial and any middle names of the primary person as seen on the record using the dictionary provided for assistance. Initials should be keyed with a space between them.

The primary name is the name of the person(s) referenced in the body or margins of the letter, i.e. the name(s) of the person(s) for whom the letter is about. Some images contain a list of names that should be keyed. These names are typically the names of prisoners. Do not key officials such as police, court personnel, etc. unless the letter is specifically about them. Do not key company or business names.

When the phrase "prisoner named in the margin" appears, the names to key should be in the margins of the image. Some images require the keyer to read the document in order to determine who to key.

Surname

Key the surname as seen on the record using the dictionary provided for assistance.

The primary name is the name of the person(s) referenced in the body or margins of the letter, i.e. the name(s) of the person(s) for whom the letter is about. Some images contain a list of names that should be keyed. These names are typically the names of prisoners. Do not key officials such as police, court personnel, etc. unless the letter is specifically about them. Do not key company or business names.

When the phrase "prisoner named in the margin" appears, the names to key should be in the margins of the image. Some images require the keyer to read the document in order to determine who to key.

Suffix

Key all titles, such as "Jr" or "III," following the surname of the primary person as seen on the record using the dictionary provided for assistance.

Record Image Samples



Index

NSWSherrifPaper Index 1.JPG

Images of an internal index. An Index usually contains names (often in alphabetical order) with a corresponding page number so as to find the individual listed. Some indexes have alphabetical tabs on the right or left margin.

Index Image Samples



Cover page, Section header, etc.

NSWSherrifPaper Capture 2.JPG

Use the “Cover page, Section header, etc” type for images that don’t contain any data, but might be interesting to look at because they provide some type of context for the image set. For instance, historical notes, affidavits, and so forth.

Cover Page Image Samples



Image with no data

NSWSherrifPaper Blank.JPG

Use the “Image with no data” type for images that don’t contain any data or any useful context that might be interesting for someone to look at. For instance, an image containing only the blank background or an image with a microfilm target on it.